HC-One has apologised after a resident living with dementia was left stuck in a cupboard

The incident took place at HC-One’s Tower Bridge Care Home in Southwark in March 2021.

Police were called to the home more than two hours after the resident went missing. The woman was taken to hospital where she received treatment for dehydration and bruising to her head.

HC-One apologised to the resident’s daughter following the incident and admitted she should have been informed earlier that her mother had gone missing.

Southwark Council was ordered to pay a £1,300 fine.

The care provider said it appeared that a care worker had left a store room cupboard unlocked.  Read

Man unlawfully deprived of liberty gets £355,000   payout from council who put him there.

Authority admits it “clearly didn’t get everything right” and    apologises to man, whose lawyers said he was unlawfully placed in a care home for seven years.

Lawyers for the man, who is autistic & has learning
disabilities, said Lancashire council admitted breaching his human rights and had agreed a £200,000 settlement & a      payment of £155,000 for a deputy to manage his property & affairs on his behalf. This has been approved by the High Court.
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Government confirms it won’t appeal COVID care home ruling.

Government confirms it won’t appeal COVID care home ruling.

The Government has decided not to appeal a High Court
decision which found that the policy of discharging patients from hospitals to care homes at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic was unlawful.

Former health secretary Matt Hancock Public Health
England (PHE
) were taken to court by two women who argued that patients with the coronavirus were discharged from
hospitals back to care homes without testing. Read

Care Home not providing records of how it spent residents money

Ombudsman criticises care home for not providing records of how it spent resident’s money.

The warning comes after Hamilton Care Ltd failed to provide a solicitor with     relevant financial records for his client.

The solicitor had been appointed to act for the woman by the court as the  woman’s dementia meant she was not able to look after her finances herself.
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Care home fined £46k+ after woman dies in fire 2019.

The court heard Elder Healthcare was not to blame for the woman’s death in a sheltered flat connected to the care home in Douglas in November 2019. However, “shortcomings” were found in fire safety training and  procedures. Since its fire safety training has been updated.

An electrical fault caused a blaze at the woman’s home which connected to Elder Grange care home.

Smoke & heat detectors were linked to the nurse call centre at the home which is required to give emergency assistance to the residence in sheltered. Detector was switched off.
The hearing was told that a smoke detector had triggered the call system, but staff could not work out which flat the alarm related to due to problems with the documentation & contact lists. The lady died in hospital.
Elder Healthcare was fined £46,000 & to pay a further £4,000 in prosecution costs and  that the firm needed to be aware
“this must never happen again”.  Details

 

Care home fined £30,000  plus costs of £7500 over woman’s death after wheelchair fall . 

The court found New Lodge Nursing Care & its manager, had failed to provide safe care & treatment to the resident who died in hospital after fracturing her thigh bone following the fall.
The Manager was also ordered to pay a fine of £800.

The court heard that in September 2018, the resident  was found on the floor of the lounge of the home by a member of staff after falling out of her wheelchair.

No medical assistance was requested and no notification of the accident reported to the CQC or any other regulatory body for nine days.

When the accident was notified it was reported that the resident had fallen & broken her hip after opening the lap belt in her wheelchair.
It was later established that no lap belt had been in place.

The resident was taken to hospital after her family called for an ambulance during a visit. She later sadly died after developing broncho-pneumonia, which can be a complication following a femoral fracture. Read

Isle of Man Care Home fined £46k after woman dies in fire

Care home fined £46k after woman dies in fire

Care home, Elder Healthcare, which runs on the Isle of Man, has been fined £46,000 for health and safety breaches after a 95-year-old died in a fire in 2019.

The court heard Elder Healthcare was not to blame for the death of Olive Renecle, who died in a sheltered flat connected to the care home in Douglas on 17th November 2019. However, Deemster, Graeme Cook, said “shortcomings” were found in fire safety training and procedures.

Elder Healthcare has since said its fire safety training has been updated.

An electrical fault caused a blaze at Ms. Renecle’s home on Fuchsia Lane, which connected to Elder Grange care home.

Smoke and heat detectors were linked to the nurse call centre at the home which is required to give emergency assistance to the residence in sheltered accommodation on Fuchsia Lane and Fuchsia Court.

The hearing was told that a smoke detector had triggered the call system, but staff could not work out which flat the alarm related to due to problems with the documentation and contact lists.

Checks were made in the home, but not in the sheltered flats 100m (0.6miles) away – which included flat 32 – owned by Olive Renecle. The alarm was temporarily switched off and no one contacted the fire service.

A neighbour called 999 after noticing smoke coming from the flat, and firefighters did attend the scene. Olive was taken to hospital but later died.

Elder Healthcare was fined £46,000 and ordered to pay a further £4,000 in prosecution costs with Deemster Cook saying that the firm needed to be aware “this must never happen again”.

The company claims it has since updated its contact lists and training, and fire risk assessments have now been put in place.

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